Contact

Leaving comments here is a a great way to reach me with questions. No posts are too old – one of the wonderful things about the internet. I read all comments because every comment is emailed to me and only shows on the blog after I approve it to cut out the spam.

Best Way to Reach Us:

  Comments & Questions: Here on the blog in the comments of any page.

CSA’s, Retail Orders, Roaster Pigs, Piglets, Breeders & other things to Walter:
Email Walterj@sugarmtnfarm.com

Wholesale Orders:
Email walterj@sugarmtnfarm.com

Phone is not a good way to reach us as we are typically outside. It is also very hard to understand people’s messages and you might not get a call back if we can’t understand your phone number on the answering machine. I won’t call back on “how to raise” or “how to vet” a pig questions – I’m not a vet, I don’t do phone tech support for pigs and I don’t like talking on the phone. Please use email or blog comments for questions. I’m really serious about this.

Retail Direct: We do sell directly to individuals – See the Product menu above. We do not have a farm stand or store front so there is no option of coming to the farm to browse what is available in the freezer. We sell out completely most weeks so there is very little meat in the cooler – we keep most of our stock on the hoof in the fields. If you’re looking to buy in small quantities please visit the many fine stores that carry our products. Also see the Literature page for our brochure, order form and other information. To get the best price, buy through the CSA, as a Whole Pig or consider the Farmer’s Basket or other box specials.

Wholesale Direct: We primarily sell wholesale through local stores and restaurants throughout Vermont and some in New Hampshire. If you would like to carry our products please see the Wholesale page in the Products menu.

Questions: Feel free to leave questions on the various blog posts. It is fine to leave questions in comments on old posts that are relevant to your question or if you’re not sure where then simply use the FAQ. By leaving questions in blog comments the information gets shared with others who will have the same questions. This benefits everyone. Explore the search function in the upper right hand column, the tag cloud a bit lower in the right column, the list of favorite posts, most commented posts and such. Note that I devote more effort to questions that get asked on the blog than to questions that are emailed to me because more people will benefit from the answers. Sometimes an answer will get turned into an entire post. Share the knowledge. Note that I am not a phone person – please use comments or email.

Farm Tours & Visits: If you come to the farm to pickup pigs or meat we can give you the quick driveway tour but we’re not setup to do farm tours, seminars, classes, internships, mentoring, workshops or agritourism. My blog is how I share what we do. Head on over to our Farm page and watch the eight minute video tour of our farm and butcher shop. You’ll get to virtually sit in the field and have a pig snuffle your nose. On my blog you’ll find approximately 2,500 articles and over 13,000 photographs from our family, farm, animals and Vermont through the seasons – more than you could ever seen in a physical tour plus it saves gas! Be sure to also read the over 25,000 comments at the ends of articles which contain many thousands of questions and answers. On the blog you’ll see our family, animals and farm from all the seasons of the year. You can leave comments and ask questions on all the posts back to 2005 – I read all comments and answer questions. Check out the various Virtual Tour posts in particular. Also see the search box, tag cloud and favorite articles lists in the right column. Want to pet farm animals? Visit Shelburne Farms in the Burlington, Vermont area or Friendly Farm in Dublin, NH for great family fun. They are setup for animal petting and such. They have tame animals that are used to being handled by visitors and will make for a wonderful family outing. If you desperately want a driveway tour then buy a pig of meat.

Internships: We’re not setup to do internships or apprenticeships. There are many how-to articles on our Farm Blog that explain how we do things. Look in the right hand column on the blog for a list of favorite articles. If you’re interested in raising pigs check out the discussion groups on Yahoo: Pastured Pork and Facebook: Pastured Pigs for Meat and Profit, the HomesteadingToday Pigs Forum and the excellent book “Small Scale Pig Raising” by Dirk Van Loon which was recently updated in 2014. [Froogle, Amazon]* Another book I sometimes suggest is “Nontraditional Feed Sources for Use in Swine Production” by P.A. Thacker & R.N. Kirkwood[1]. If you’re interested in interning then visit WWOOF and find out about opportunities around the world.

Dogs should not be brought to the farm. Realize we have a large pack of large livestock guardian dogs. They might think your dog is a threat to our livestock and eat your pet – No kidding. Our dogs normally and naturally kill and eat coyotes and other predators. Your dog will look like a coyote from their perspective. Please do not even bring a dog and leave it in your car as our dogs will likely jump up on your car to investigate and they have sharp, hard claws that will scratch your car’s paint. Best to leave your dog at home.

Well behaved children are welcome when you visit to pickup your pigs or meat but we do not have a playground and farm’s are not “child safe” places. There are dangerous things on a farm so children should stick close to the adults and not wander.

Phone is not a good way to reach us as we are generally outside in the fields or woods and we go to bed early. Please do not call after 7 pm even to leave a message. The phone is for sales only – email the way to ask questions. In voice mail is very hard to understand people’s messages at times, especially if you’re calling on a cellphone, and you won’t get a call back if we can’t understand your phone number on the answering machine. If you have a question about ordering you can call at four-three-nine sixty-four sixty-two in Vermont (area code 802) from 12 noon to 1 pm or 5 pm to 6 pm on Monday, Tuesday or Saturday. I realize many people enjoy chatting on the phone but I really don’t – I’m just not a phone person. Email is much better than phone since I am usually outside on the farm, in the forest or cutting meat in the butcher shop.

I hope you enjoy my blog, a taste of farm and family life in the mountains of Vermont. Perhaps if you are close you’ll be able to also enjoy our pork through local stores and restaurants as well as buying directly from use through our CSA, roasters, live piglets or other pork products. We enjoy sharing the bounty of our land as well as what we have learned over the decades.

Buy Locally, Think Globally, Do Good, Live Well & Prosper.

Cheers!

-Walter Jeffries
Sugar Mountain Farm, LLC
252 Riddle Pond Road
West Topsham, VT 05086

Member:
Northeast Organic Farming Association of Vermont (NOFA-VT)
Vermont Fresh Network,
Rural Vermont
The Vermont Grass Farmers’ Association,
Vital Communities
PasturedPork.org,
and a NoWeirdStuff.org farm.

Vermont Dept of Agriculture Wholesale & Retail Licenses
USDA Inspected & Slaughtered

*Note that I have no affiliation with the book sellers. These are just search patterns that generally will find used copies of excellent books for you.

448 Responses to Contact

  1. Tony C. says:

    Hi am looking for 5 pieces of real sheep knuckle bones. Please help…

  2. Iain Cameron says:

    Hi Walter,
    Great website; very informative and hugely drole… unusual characteristics in many of your competitors’ sites.
    I’m raising a small group of Large Black gilts for the freezer; they’re on pasture plus fruit/ veg/ bread etc, and I’m topping them up with pig nuts from the local agricultural merchant. I have previously worked with the ‘1Lb of food per animal per month of age (up to 6)’ formula, but this has produced overly fat meat. Is there any scientific way of judging fat cover so as to alter the pig nut accordingly? Or is it just a gentle squeeze/pinch when they’re not looking?
    Many thanks, and keep up the good work!
    Regards,
    IainC, Shropshire, England. Where we don’t all boil all of the food!

    • Fat cover is typically measured along the spine at about the ninth rib. Old way was a special knife they stuck down to the bone. Modern method is more humane with a sonogram. I do neither. I watch the shape of the animals. Their jowl, back line, hame line, hips, etc. I’m both their creator and their disassembler which gives me a lot of opportunity to develop a keen eye from experience. You can do the same even with a hired butcher just by carefully looking at you pigs, save pictures, and then looking at the cuts of meat. Develop a keen eye in all that you do.

      • Iain Cameron says:

        Thanks Walter. Keen eye in training. And I’m plotting a graph of weights (calculated using your string formula) week by week, hoping to spot any trends. So far, they’re just getting bigger!

  3. Etienne says:

    Hi,

    have you thought about selling semen from your boars? So far I have no practical experience, but it can be harvested when a boar mounts a sow in heat, and kept a few weeks at room temperature with the right semen extender.

    I am interested in your genetics, but even importing semen might be difficult.

    Best

    • Are you volunteering as the collector?

      • Etienne says:

        If the plane tickets weren’t so expensive and the visa requirements not so complicated I would…
        Otherwise, would you let a vet/technician on your farm to collect it, if the costs are covered by the sale of the semen? Do you know of someone you trust who is experienced in doing it who you would let? About how much would it cost, without the regulatory stuff?

        • It’s an interesting question. I have been asked by many people for sales of semen. I don’t know anyone around here who does it.

          • Etienne says:

            I know you rarely have a vet at your place, and don’t like it because of the risk of disease transmission, but is there one you trust? Or a good agricultural school around?

          • Yes, there is a vet we work with. She has a traveling office – her truck. When we sell breeders that will travel out of state it is required to get a vet health certificate. She just does livestock. When she comes here she makes us her first stop of the day, she washes her truck prior to coming here and she parks the truck at the entrance, booties and suits up to come to the animal areas and then we do all the actual animal wrangling so she’s not actually in with the animals and not touching the animals. This provides excellent biosecurity. If you’re in Vermont I highly recommend her. She is Alison Cornwall of Health Farms Veterinarian Services.

          • Dawn says:

            The collection of boars can be an interesting experience to say the least. I didn’t like the old cheesecloth in a small thermos method so I bought a goat AV (Artificial Vagina) unit. This made the process not such a hands on…er…job…:O) I still have to provide the ‘squeeze’ with one hand and most find a gloved hand acceptable. The goat AV unit collects the semen in a more sterile pouch that is not easily spilled. From that unit you can then strain out the before and after plug material and add the semen extender, put the semen into straws and either ship it or freeze it.
            Being safe while collecting and right after can be an issue as some boars will want to take a nap afterwards or find food and then take a nap, or they are just really pissed off enough for you to be their food.

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