Pigs Fix Fences


Fence Pigs Will Fix

Our land is not straight, level nor plumb. Rather it waves up and down the slopes of the mountain. That tends to make fencing a bit of a challenge. Fence lines like to be pulled tight to straight lines, especially the high tensile fencing I favor for its longevity.

In the photo above the land waves along the fence line. Over time the pigs will nose rocks and dirt to fill in that low spot creating a terrace. For this reason we fence along the contours of the land. This way the natural forces of nose, hoof, wind, water and frost build level areas in our paddocks so that gradually our land imitates the nicely terraced mountains of Asia and Central America. It’s a slow process. We’re patient people.

Outdoors: 46°F/23°F Sunny
Tiny Cottage: 64°F/58°F

Daily Spark: One man’s waste stream is another pig’s wallow.

About Walter Jeffries

Tinker, Tailor...
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5 Responses to Pigs Fix Fences

  1. chuck adams says:

    I started a farmstead in earnest at the age of 53. I have come to learn how much patience is needed to farm naturally . The problem is , at my age , I wonder if I have time for patience .
    I look at my property differently now . After all the thought has gone into determining how to best utilize each area , and the plan developes , so does the ‘vision’ of the farm . With that blueprint in mind , I started out like each day was my last . It took months to get myself to regulate my pace and enjoy my work , understanding that the journey would be just as rewarding as the vision incarnate . Now Ive been at it just long enough to experience the necessity of change in a farm , whether it be due to the information gleened from your particular property , intentional changes in your desired product , the needs of your particular animals , or , the particular ‘style’ of work and farming that you develope in time . Patience has been a cornerstone throughout my entire life , and I picked up on the word and how you used it , immediately , in your blog about the pigs fixing your fence lines . Such simple notion , but so profound . Again , you point greenhorns in the right direction , seemingly , without realizing it .
    Congrats on your new facilities . What an amazing accomplishment . I have found that ,after counting on the nearest USDA facility to process my goats , they have decided not to process small ruminants because the profit margin is too low . This place is 10 minutes away ! Now I face a multi hour trip with an animal that gets sick with stress . I didnt realize each facility could have a different model , and change at whim . There certainly are no shortages of hardships in farming !

  2. Ian Chapman says:

    I really like the sound of your contour fences, but I know they present their own difficulties, even in moderately sloping country. I’d love to see some photos of yours. Thanks for your informative site. Cheers.

  3. Daniel Neeleman says:

    Hi Walter – Question for you. If the perimeter fence of our property is a cattle-geared barbed wire fence, would you deem it necessary to hogify this fence with woven wire or another method? For interior fencing we plan on training the pigs to single or double strands of electric fencing as we rotationally graze them, but should we be worried that the electric fence will fail at times and that a tight permanent perimeter fence is needed as a back-up fence to keep animals off the neighbors property?

    Sincerely,

    Daniel

    • Barbed wire is meant for cattle, sheep and maybe goats. Very bad for pigs, horses and humans. Never put barbed wire and electric wire on the same fence line. Never ever electrify barbed wire.

      A very good pig fence is woven wire down low and hot wires above. See Pig Proof Fence.

      How hard you have to fence depends on the value of the animals and the local issues like busy roads, neighbors, etc.

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