Throw Them Bones


Knuckle Bones just out of the Oven

For the Kickstarter project we offered Knuckle Bone Dice as one of the prizes. Knuckle bones were widely used in times gone past as dice for games of chance, like jacks and for fortune telling. The bones are fascinatingly complex with knobs, niches, groves and what not. They fit together and run smoothly against each other. A complete set would make a cool 3D puzzle.

I was surprised at how many people requested them so I’ve needed to make up more knuckle bones. This involves first making soup stock from the trotters, the pigs feet. We then pick out the bones and these get further boiled to clean them. After three boilings we dry them overnight and then they’re ready for the oven where they bake at 350°F for several hours to dry them completely and then roast at 400°F for half an hour which gives them the aged yellow appearance.

The pile of bones above is four feet, that is to say one pig. A pig generally is four feet long. This might lead to a good riddle, “What is four feet, has four feet and stands on four feet?” or something like that…

Outdoors: 24°F/14°F Cloudy
Tiny Cottage: 63°F/58°F

Daily Spark: Contrary to the myths of Hollywood, pigs are not particularly intelligent nor are they nice. Fortunately they are very tasty and ever so useful.

About Walter Jeffries

Tinker, Tailor...
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One Response to Throw Them Bones

  1. Melissa says:

    Love the bones!! Art, gaming , riddles. . . . . bones are interesting . . . . Reminds me of my older son’s 4th birthday party when we used plywood cutouts painted white to become the bones for a “dinosaur dig” in the new sand box. Now that he is older I think he would enjoy digging real bones and examine the findings. Producing our own food has increased his appreciation for the function of bones.

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