Guy Noir


Guy Noir – Boaring in Far South Field

This is Guy Noir, our south herd secondary boar. He’s in the brush of the far south field which we converted from forest back in 2009. It is now filled with great regen which the pigs love. This year they’re bush hogging it in sections to turn it into more mature pasture like the south field and home fields we already converted.
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Jolie in North Home Field

Amazingly, the north home field, shown above with Jolie grazing, used to be brushy like the Far South Field. That field has never been mechanically mowed. It has just had the grazing of the pigs, sheep and chickens.

Converting using the animal power is slower than using a bulldozer but it keeps more of the organic matter and is a gentler process on the land. The animals also deposit manure on the fields to enrich the soil and clover will suck down nitrogen over the years during the process of making the fields.

Outdoors: 73°F/47°F Sunny, 1″ Rain in Evening
Tiny Cottage: 71°F/67°F

Daily Spark: Don’t let your dogma get in the way or reality will it run over.

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About Walter Jeffries

Tinker, Tailor...
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8 Responses to Guy Noir

  1. Karl says:

    making pasture the natural way makes for the most beautiful pasture. aesthetically a bulldozer alters the land in a strange way that seems to steal some of the random beauty that can be.

  2. Susan Lea says:

    I like your French names as well as the natural process of creating pasture.

  3. JP Swift says:

    Did the pigs stump the North Home Field that Jolie is shown in? Do you just cut the trees and allow the pigs to do there thing over time? I’m in this process right now and was wondering if I would have to do something mechanical to remove stumps?

    • There were few big stumps, mostly brush in the North Home Field. The South Field had many more stumps. The pigs do work them but not to the level that I’ve heard people claim. I have heard people say to put corn around the stump, drilled into the stump, use molasses, etc. I tried these and a number of other enticements but they didn’t work. Rather it is a very long process, perhaps 10 years, with the stump rotting and gradually the pigs breaking it down. For us this is not a problem since we do not run machinery, e.g., mowers, tillers, etc, on these fields. Instead we have learned to flush cut the trees so the stumps are low and in time they’ll rot out.

  4. Jessie N. says:

    Re: Daily Spark: My karma ran over my dogma.

  5. Pablo says:

    Well, send them to Roundrock and assign them to the acre of land behind my cabin. I’d sure like to have that cleared of scrub as a fire break. I’ll even provide the beer.

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