Splitting Axe


Winged Splitting Axe

This is the best splitting axe I’ve ever used. It was recommended to me by a friend a couple of years ago. The wings that come off the sides of the eight pound head coupled with the narrow leading edge cause the logs to fly apart. Now with our small woodstove in the tiny cottage we burn small logs that can be split with an axe. This was not always so.

Until recently I split wood with wedges and a sledge hammer since our old farm house had a huge wood furnace. The monster would take 42″ long by 14″ diameter logs so splitting wood was rarely necessary. The few times we needed to split logs they were massive pieces so a mere axe was not an option, thus the wedges and hammer.

Cold weather, like these past few days helps too. I had some particularly twisted big pieces of ironwood that I had saved for a day like this. The cold makes the wood more fragile and one blow with the splitting axe shattered a log that had been very frustrating on a warmer day. Shards of wood flying everywhere rather than the normal splitting in half. Quite impressive, wear eye protection.

Outdoors: 9°F/-1°F Overcast, 1″ Snow
Farm House: 52°F/41°F
Tiny Cottage: 62°F/59°F

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About Walter Jeffries

Tinker, Tailor…

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14 Responses to Splitting Axe

  1. Jonathan says:

    HI there. I just wanted to write and say how much my wife and i enjoy your blog. It is great to see people who are not afraid to step out and do something out of the “ordinary”. Currently my wife and I are looking for some land. We are trying to start a demonstration farm here in Indonesia. Your blog has given me many ideas including free ranging here in the tropics. Now all i need to find is electric fence. Keep up the good work.

    Jonathan

  2. karl says:

    i had one of those splitters with the little wings. i got it at a garage sale with several other hand tools–all for five dollars. i sold it after trying to use it. i couldn’t get used to it. maybe i was distracted by the bright color? my replacement maul has a much longer handle and weighs fifteen pounds. i find the color less distracting. better yet, it has the benefit of being able to split chinese elm. ironwood is hardly a challenge for it. being ridiculously heavy means that all you have to do is get it up over your head and aim. gravity does most of the work.

  3. Karl, you had a problem with the color! :) Shocked, just shocked! :)

    I would love it if this splitting axe were more massive but this was the largest they had. You’re certainly right about it being nice to have the extra mass do the work.

  4. Great Maul. I burn pine as there are now millions and millions of acres of bug killed pine in British Columbia. About thirty acres on my own property. Not a hard wood to split. I usually use a small, electric wood splitter. I treated them with disdain until I actually tried one. Still for bigger rounds with knots its hard to beat a maul, and sledge hammer. And it just plain feels good.

  5. Cindy says:

    Hi. I too have had an axe like this and think it the best splitter have ever used. I am not terribly strong so appreciated that it is lighter than a maul and just as effective. It has the added bonus that it never gets stuck in the wood. I bought it under the brand name Monster Maul and found if I blew out through my mouth at the point of impact, the wood invariably split. Go figure..
    Also have a garden cart similiar to the one pictured and I could not get along without it. Use it for everything from hauling hay and feed to gathering veges from the garden. I have found the kids are always willing to help pull it no matter how heavy.
    In the winter I use a wooden kicksled to move tubs of water and feed to the barn. It moves effortlessly and with luck I can coast the entire trip. Have to be careful not to crash into the door as I have no brake and the weight can make enough momentum for a speedy trip. In the past I also used this sled as a dog sled, something you might want to consider for winter recreation and to keep your dogs in shape in winter. Work isn’t work if your having fun. Thanks for sharing, Cindy

  6. Ah, Cindy, you have become enlightened with the way of the flying wedge. It’s a Zen thing. :) I too find the exhale on the strike, just like with a punch or kick, to be effective for the same reasons. I also drop my body as I strike thus adding some of my 180 lbs behind the blow. This and sub-zero weather really makes the wood explode!

  7. after reading your blog, all i want to do now is to have a splitting axe. now, i am sure that it is very useful tool than the others. thanks for that information.

  8. Want to try this splitting axe. Well nice post, very informative. i will introduce this tool to my friends. Thanks again.

  9. Jeremy says:

    Thanks for the post.

    Any idea where I could find myself one of these axes?

    I’ve been looking online and can’t find any. I live in the UK

  10. Farmerbob1 says:

    “big pieces if ironwood”
    Ah, the if/of typo. I do it all the time too.

    I also remember cutting wood with a maul when I was a teen. I got tired of futzing with an axe, and just stopped using the axe entirely. This looks like an interesting hybrid. You don’t have any problem with bounce-back on tougher wood, despite the light weight?

    • Got it! Thanks. On the splitting axe, a sharp edge helps prevent bounce back but the basic design is really very efficient. It is thin at the leading edge and then widens greatly such that it simply works very well. Mostly the wood is not the twisty type and then it’s just single hits to split almost all the time. Technique helps too.

  11. Angela Williams says:

    I got a good idea about the splitting maul.Most of the wood is not a diversion type and it is the only hit to be split almost all the time. Very nice article.Thank you

  12. mobarak says:

    Great splitting Maul.really nice article.thanks

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